[Home] [Appalachian] [Shaker] [Nantucket] [Contemporary] [Native American] [Collection] [blog]

These are some of my favorite links. - Tony


JoAnn Kelly Catsos - JoAnn Kelly Catsos is a fantastic teacher. She and her husband Steve produce wonderful splint, sold as Birkshire Splint. They also make all their own molds and kits. Vist her new site for samples of her award winning baskets, workshop information and a downloadable catalog of kits and molds.

Eric Taylor - Eric Taylor is a great teacher, and innovator in black ash basketry. If you have a chance, take a class with Eric. His baskets are both elegant and functional, and his materials are wonderful. Eric sells a full line of kits and some of the unique tools he likes.

John C. Campbell Folk School - The John C. Campbell Folk School is one of the best experience you will ever have. I have gone for a number of years now and have enjoyed every minute there and can't wait for the next trip. They offer a wide variety of classes in all forms or arts and crafts, but of course the basket classes from nationally reknown basketmakers is what I go for.

Martha Wetherbee - Martha is a great teacher and Shaker historian. I have learned so much in her classes. Contact her to find out where she is going to be teaching in your area. Or, better yet, come to one of the annual classes I host with Martha each Summer!

Nantucket Basket Works - If you love Nantucket baskets, you will see some of the best baskets on this site. The baskets are woven by Alan Reed, Nap Plank and others along featuring ivory carving and scrimshaw by some incredibly talented artists. I was fortunate to meet both of these gentlemen on a trip to Nantucket a few years ago. They don't list prices, which I think means, "If you have to ask, you can't afford it..." Belive me if I could I would own one of these masterpieces.

Royalwood Ltd. - On my way out East I used to always make a point of stopping by the shop to pick up some great odds and ends. Also whenever I make it to a convention I always look them up. They have a great selection of standard basket supplies, but all the extras are what I go for. They have the best selection and range of colors of waxed linen around.

Alice Ogden - I am fortunate to have over a dozen of Alice's baskets in my collection. I also was able to go out to New Hampshire to take a class with the talented brown ash basket maker in 2004. Her baskets are very reasonable priced and made to be used. While they are beautiful to display you don't have to worry about using these sturdy baskets.

Black Ash Baskets - Jonathan Kline is a fabulous traditional back ash basket maker. Not only are his baskets beautiful, but also his web site is one of the best. I have one of his baskets in my collection, one of these days I will get it added to my "collection" gallery.

D.E.L.S. - Another great source of Nantucket molds and supplies. They have a wide selection of scrimshaw and bone fittings that are reasonably priced. The website is a little quirky so you may find it easier to just give them a call and describe what you are looking for.

Shaker Workshops - They sell beautiful reproduction Shaker furniture either assembled or in kit form. They have a great calendar of Shaker events taking place across the nation.

Alan Beebe's Basketry Information - Another older site and pretty outdated, but still a great source for information and links to shops, guilds and websites.

Pine Needle Group - If you love pineneedle coiled baskets you will love this site. My favorite section is the galleries of coiled baskets from a wide range or artists working in all styles.

Tim Parson's Lightship Basket Shop - This Nantucket island based artist has a on-line gallery of his beautiful baskets here and he offers some very interesting and unique basket making tools and basic supplies.


[Top of Page]


Appalachian Baskets | Shaker Baskets | Nantucket Baskets | Contemporary Baskets | Native American Baskets | My Collection | Blog


[Email Button]

[Main Menu Button]

Email Me
Your Thoughts

Return To
Main Menu

Page created October, 2001
Copyright, J. Anthony Stubblefield, 1997-2012